Animal pound

The Melton Council Animal Pound is located at 90-92 High Street, Melton. The entrance is located just past the SES Building.
 

It is open to collect your pet or adopt a pet between 9.30am - 11am and 3pm - 4.30pm, 7 days a week (excluding public holidays). To  make an appointment outside of these hours, please call 9747 7200 or email csu@melton.vic.gov.au .

Closed Public Holidays 

Lost pets register

If you have lost a pet, view the lost pets register to see if it is currently at the Pound. The register is updated during the week as animals are received so we encourage you to check back regularly. 

Found animals

If you find an animal, call the Council Ranger on 9747 7200, even after business hours.

A ranger will collect stray, contained dog pickups from 5pm-10pm on weeknights and between 8.30am and 10.00pm on Saturday, Sunday and public holidays.

Adopting a pet

We work with animals shelters to rehome animals. If you would like to adopt a pet, view our animals currently available for adoption or visit the Pet Rescue site. You can also visit the pound to meet animals looking for new homes.

Impounded Pets

Council is required to keep a dog or cat for eight days if it is impounded.

Collecting your pet

If you wish to collect your pet from the pound you will need to:

  • register your pet (over the age of three months) with Council
  • microchip your pet
  • provide proof of ownership
  • show identification such as a driver’s license
       

Animal Release Costs

  • impounded animal release fees apply $92.25 (dog) and $46.65 (cat)
  • daily fees will apply $19.00 (dog) and $16.50 (cat)  
  • a registration fee will apply if the animal is not registered
  • a microchip fee of $90.50 will apply if the animal has not been microchipped.
  • Impounded Livestock release fees apply $62.55 (per animal) and daily fees will apply $18.45 (per animal) 

 Additional fines may be imposed for unregistered animals and animals at large. Animals not wearing Council identification marker outside their property can also risk a penalty under the Domestic Animal Act 1994.