Planning

Estate Subdivision Planning

This stage involves submitting a Planning Permit Application to Council for the proposed works. Council's Planning Officer will assess the proposed development against the provisions of the Melton Planning Scheme and any relevant Precinct Structure Plan.

Once Council and referral authorities are satisfied with the application and the assessment is complete a Planning Permit can be issued.

All subdivision proposals will require an application for subdivision, except where the planning scheme, PSP or Schedule to Urban Growth Zone provides an exemption.

The information that should be lodged with a planning permit application for subdivision is set out in Clause 56 of the Planning Scheme. The Precinct Structure Plan or the Schedule to the Urban Growth Zone may modify the information required. Generally the information required will show how the permit application implements the Precinct Structure Plan.

Please see Link to checklist of all information(DOC, 184KB) which will normally need to accompany the planning application.  Note this may vary depending on what was identified for lodgement at the pre application stage.

Permit Application

Traffic Report

A detailed report on the traffic impact, both internal and external, to a proposed subdivision as part of the planning application. The traffic report shall include designated street hierarchy, maximum predicted traffic volumes generated, traffic management methods, public transport routes, bicycle routes, typical cross-section elements and other relevant traffic information.

Stormwater Management Strategy

A detailed report on the drainage impact, both internal and external, to a proposed subdivision as part of the planning application.  The Stormwater Management Strategy shall consider any Melbourne Water Development Services Scheme and staging of works, include detail flow paths of major storm events, locations of temporary or ultimate retarding basins, stormwater quality measures and other drainage information. 

Integrated Water Management Strategy

A detailed report on the provision of alternative sources of water for fit for purposes uses within the subdivision.  This includes amongst other things, passive irrigation of street trees, provision of water tanks on allotments, stormwater harvesting near Active Recreational Reserves, recycled water and other integrated water management opportunities. 

Servicing Report

A report that shows an overall utility (including but not limited to: sewer, water, electrical, gas and telecommunications) servicing strategy that identifies works relevant and required external to the subdivision, as well as the indicative alignment of major/trunk mains within the proposed street network. 

Title

Provide a full, current copy of the title for each individual parcel of land forming the subject site (the title includes the covering 'register search statement' the title diagram and the associated title documents, known as 'instruments' e.g. Restrictive covenants.)

For further information please visit www.landata.vic.gov.au.

Heritage

Before planning any development activities, it is important to determine if there are heritage constraints on the property you are developing. These could be archaeological, such as sites listed on the Victorian Heritage Inventory Website  or places listed on Council's Heritage Overlay schedule . If your property contains a Heritgae Overlay place then you must talk to Council about permit requirements and have a pre application meeting with the Planning Department.

Council generally does not support demolition of any heritage place and therefore development applications must plan for the conservation of heritage places in an appropriate setting or context. Adaptation of heritage places for Council has a free Heritage Advisory Service to assist applicants and provides Heritage Assistance Funds for the repair and conservation of heritage places.

Cultural Heritage Management Plan

Before starting any development activities, it is important you understand if it could affect Aboriginal cultural heritage.  A Cultural Heritage Management Plan (CHMP) is required when high impact activities are planned in an area of cultural heritage sensitivity, as defined by the Aboriginal Heritage Regulations 2007.  In such an area, planning permits, licences and work authorities cannot be issued unless a CHMP has been approved for the activity. 

Visit Aboriginal Victoria website for further guidance on determining whether a Cultural Heritage Management Plan is required for your development and an overview of the process.

A copy of your approved CHMP must be submitted to Council, when you lodge your planning permit application.

Post Permit Requirements

Native Vegetation

In the majority of cases, surveying of native vegetation was completed during preparation of the Precinct Structure Plan (PSP) and/or during the time-stamped mapping project.  Refer to the Native Vegetation Precinct Plan (NVPP) or Native Vegetation Removal Plan in the relevant Precinct Structure Plan, which will show native vegetation that may be removed (subject to sourcing offsets) and native vegetation that must be retained and protected. 

Your application must clearly demonstrate that the proposed development will not impact native vegetation to be retained.  Concept plans must demonstrate compliance with the relevant Native Vegetation Precinct Plan, i.e. clearly show native vegetation to be removed and native vegetation to be retained, including the required protection measures.  Typically, vegetation protection requirements are as follows:

  • Scattered trees: A radius of twice the canopy distance
  • Patches of native vegetation: at least 2m buffer around the patch of vegetation
  • Trees within patches: Tree Protection Zones in accordance with the Australian Standard for Protection of Trees on Development Sites; AS4970; 2009 - a distance of 12 times the diameter of the tree measured at 1.4m above the ground.  The maximum TPZ is 15m and the minimum TPZ is 2m: Tree Protection Zones - TPZ / SRZ Calculator

If your project area falls within the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy (BCS; DEPI 2013), then native vegetation was mapped during the time-stamped mapping project.  Native vegetation within a Biodiversity Conservation Strategy conservation area must be retained and protected.  Native vegetation outside conservation areas may be removed, unless a Native Vegetation Precinct Plan or Native Vegetation removal Plan specifies otherwise.

Development in the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy area is subject to the payment of habitat compensation fees to DELWP for the removal of native vegetation and/or the removal of habitat for threatened species (e.g. Growling Grass Frog, Striped Legless Lizard, Golden Sun-moth, Spiny Rice-flower).  You can estimate your habitat compensation obligations using the Estimate your obligations online tool

If your project area falls outside the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and outside a Precinct Structure Plan, then a site assessment must be conducted by a qualified ecologist.  Your planning permit application must be accompanied by a report by a suitably qualified ecologist and follow the Guidelines for the removal, destruction or lopping of native vegetation (DELWP 2017).  You must demonstrate efforts taken to avoid and minimise the removal of native vegetation and include an Offset Strategy.  Refer to the applicant’s guide.

Applications to remove native vegetation that is designated to be retained in a Native Vegetation Precinct Plan: if your proposal includes the proposed removal of native vegetation which is designated to be retained in a NVPP, then you must apply for a planning permit to remove that native vegetation under clause 52.16 of the Melton Planning Scheme.  Under clause 52.16, you must meet the application requirements outlined in the Guidelines for the removal, destruction or lopping of native vegetation (DELWP 2017).

Note: Council does not generally support the removal of native vegetation that is designated to be retained in a Native Vegetation Precinct Plan.  Your application must outline measures taken to avoid and minimise impact on native vegetation, outline site constraints and explain why the removal of native vegetation cannot be avoided.