Live greener

Please note: from 1 July 2020, residents will be able to start putting loose food waste into the green bin along with garden waste.  By placing food and garden waste into the green bin, instead of the red bin, you will play an important role in diverting waste from landfill.
Visit FOGO for more information.

City of Melton residents are diverting huge quantities of green waste from landfill each year, and it is important that we continue to do so, as the methane produced from organic matter in landfill is 25 times more harmful to the environment than CO2.

On average more than 40 per cent of material sent to landfill each year is organic material; most of this is regular household food waste. 

Simple changes in the home can make a huge difference, such as reducing your food waste by composting, using a worm farm or feeding suitable green scraps to pet chickens, rabbits and guinea pigs.

FOGO (Food Organics. Green Organics)

From 1 July 2020, residents will be able to start putting loose food waste into the green bin along with garden waste.  By placing food and garden waste into the green bin, instead of the red bin, you will play an important role in diverting waste from landfill.

Why?
Council currently processes around 6,700 tonnes of garden waste materials from the City's kerbside green bins.  However, recent audits undertaken by Council found that almost 60 per cent of waste thrown into the red bin by a typical City of Melton household each week is food scraps and garden waste materials, putting additional and unnecessary pressure on landfill, rather than being processed into compost, it releases noxious greenhouse gases such as methane and carbon dioxide.

By using the green bin service, your garden and food materials will be processed into mulch and nutrient rich compost that improves soil health, fertility and productivity for use in the agricultural and horticultural sector.

Visit FOGO for more information.

Composting

You can recycle most of your organic household and garden waste and put it back into your garden, improving your soil quality and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Information on creating great compost as well as what you can and can't put in can be found on the CleanUp Australia and Sustainability Victoria websites.

Worm farm

Worm farming is another great way to compost food scraps. Worms will eat most of your kitchen waste and process it into rich plant food. It can be:

  • mixed with potting soil and used for houseplants and patio containers
  • used as mulch for potted plants.
  • finely sprinkled on lawns as a conditioner
  • used directly in the garden around existing plants or dug into the soil
  • made into liquid fertiliser by being mixed with water until it is the colour of weak tea
  • moisture drained from the worm farm’s bottom crate is also a good liquid fertiliser, once diluted. 

Find out more about creating a worm farm on the CleanUp Australia and Sustainability Victoria websites.

Bokashi bin

Bokashi bins are small containers that you can place indoors or outdoors that you can put food scraps in. You will need to buy and add a bokashi mix (sometimes referred to as Bokashi bran or grains) which is available from gardening stores.

As the waste starts to ferment, Bokashi juice will form in the bottom of the bucket which can be drained off and diluted with water. This can then be used as fertiliser for your garden and plants.

Find out more about Bokashi bins on the Sustainability Victoria website.